Monday, August 18, 2014

This song is amazing

(Source: Spotify)

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Startup abortion

Until this afternoon, I was leading a startup endeavor. Starting today, I don’t have a tech project keeping me awake at night, for the first time in three years.

Three years ago I left my studies to build a startup. The project we had morphed into another, that one into yet another and so on until this afternoon, where financial imperatives halted the Markov Chain of Hell. Of course these imperatives are what they are, but hubris tend to turn them into simple details. The hubris left months ago, and FounderFuel gave a rejection this afternoon, after we made it to second round.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, rejection feels good for the first time today.

Monday, July 28, 2014 Wednesday, June 11, 2014
People ask me what I’m proudest of and what are my biggest frustrations as President. My biggest frustration is that this society hasn’t been willing to take some basic steps to keep guns out of the hands of people who can do damage. We’re the only developed country where this happens. And it happens weekly. Our levels of gun violence are off the charts.

President Obama sharing the difficulties of trying to change a culture in which school shootings are commonplace. (via whitehouse)


I recently exchanged a few tweets with one anti-gun-regulation person, and I must say this whole situation is jarring.

(Source: chels)

Wednesday, May 21, 2014

Slickness is not the problem

I’m probably not a designer, but I think I can find my way around.

Jason Fried, a prominent designer, has written about the over- and misuse of “slick” design. The argument goes that we can now find a lot of websites around that look all pretty much the same, many of which fail to properly emphasize content over form. Substance over style:

Most of these designs can be described like this: First, you see a huge photo with some text over it. Then, as you scroll down, the background slides away and another big photo with more text on it pops up. And so on….

He goes on to give examples of successful websites that are heavy on text, and light on images.

The folks at 37signals have strong opinions and I admire that. I don’t agree with this view, though.

  • First of all, most people on the web are not related to the web design world, so they don’t see as many of these “what’s hot in web” sites. They don’t see as many websites that all look the same. If you’re making a website for the general public, chances are your visitors won’t have this thought at all.

  • Visual similarity is not a problem per se. Talented web designers want to create designs that look unique, and their clients want their brand to look unique. For visitors, though, familiarity yields comfort and helps direct attention on content rather than ornaments.

  • If a visually-rich design fails to emphasize the right things, it’s a failure of the design, not of the idea of visual richness.

  • Text over a large blurred image, it is everywhere on the web. Take a step back and look at your laptop (or smartphone) screen, and notice the visual context around it. When reading on the screen, you’re looking at text over a large (fullscreen!) blurred image that spans your whole visual field.

    This web design trend is a metaphor for what happens everyday when you consume text. It’s putting you in a controlled visual context, thereby setting the emotional tone for the content you’re about to absorb. It can surely be misused, but it’s nowhere near a bad idea.

Sunday, May 11, 2014

(Source: 9gag)

Wednesday, February 19, 2014
parislemon:

nevver:

Jorge Luis Borges

Good motto.

Totally agreed

parislemon:

nevver:

Jorge Luis Borges

Good motto.

Totally agreed

Thursday, January 9, 2014
parislemon:

nevver:

Why I Love Headphones

Yep.

True
Tuesday, December 24, 2013
parislemon:

minimalmac:

A sign of truth.

I’m positive I’ve reblogged this before. And I’m positive I’ll reblogged this again.

Confirmed almost every single day

parislemon:

minimalmac:

A sign of truth.

I’m positive I’ve reblogged this before. And I’m positive I’ll reblogged this again.

Confirmed almost every single day

(Source: )

Thursday, December 5, 2013

Best way to remove a tag from a remote Git repository

Every now and then, I need to remove a tag from a remote git repository. Yes, it doesn’t happen very often, and of course it’s on Github. At the time of this writing, the first google result for doing this (because it’s not obvious), is from this really nice guy. However, it’s still an obscure command (at least to me), so I almost always have to google for it when I badly need to remove a remote tag. So I got angry and decided to make a shell command.

function grt() { git push origin :refs/tags/$@ }

If you put this in your ~/.bash_profile, you’ll be able, next time, to simply type:

grt some_tag_to_remove

and that will take care of removing the remote tag. A lot simpler to remember!